History of Welsh music

History of Welsh music

Home for Stereophonic, Shirley Bassey, Katherine Jenkins and music legend Tom (the Voice) Jones, Wales also deserve her dear nickname of ‘The Land of Song’. Wales has a unique and colorful musical culture, which takes everything from bagpipes and harps, to male choirs and contemporary musical styles. Even the singing of the pub is very melodious here. The modern musical procession in Wales stands on the shoulders of 900 years of musical history.
The making of melodious singing and music is an integral part of the Welsh hills and valleys. Long before his songs were held on paper, Wales had a strong musical tradition and strong spoken songs. Medieval writer Geraldus Cambrensis recorded the tunefulness of the Omnipresent from Welsh. Traveling through Wales in 1187, he wrote that “their instruments are enthralling and pleasing to the ear”. The songs are often based on seasonal events and ceremonial parties, such as the traditional boxing song ‘Hunting the Wren’ and a Candlemas sweet snack. Traditional instruments include a triple harp, crwth (string harp) and a pipe tool known as pibgorn. The great and good of the land employ professional poets and professional singers, known as bards, who are paid handsomely to praise their masters. In 1176, Ewingdfod was first held at Cardigan’s court. This entry into the famous poetry and music competition was initially limited to professional bets, although Eisteddfodau then opened their doors to non-professionals as well. The ‘Acts of Union’ (1535-1542) annexed Wales to England and decided that the next English was the only language used in Wales. This poses a threat to the local music culture in singing in the mother tongue, but nothing can stop Welsh singing.

History of Welsh music

In the 18th and 19th centuries, traditional music became associated with boredom and low morality. Religious music is now becoming famous, as singing hymns are gaining in popularity. Writer William Williams wrote an interesting singing song, such as ‘My Guimbing, O Thou Great Redeemer’, which is still popular today. He and other composers built on the roots of the British people and then incorporated Welsh folk music into their hymns. The Welsh choir singer is unique because of its relationship with both the chapel and the Eisteddfod competition arena. In 1895, the Dunvant Boys Choir was formed, claiming to be the first male voice choir in Wales. Composed of melodic fraternities from mines, miners and steelworkers, they signaled the start of the long and proud tradition of the Welsh sound choir. A chorus of 8,000 has been performed and there are now more than 200 male choirs in Wales.

As the strength of the church began to diminish, in the nineteenth century until the 21st century there was an inevitable increase in the creation of secular music. Composers like Joseph Parry, David Jenkins and D. Emlyn Evans composed hymns for the Victorian musical taste. These were then sung both in churches and chapels and outside these religious boundaries as well. As music expanded once more into the wider community, the male choir grew in popularity, working-class brass bands began to flourish and Wales experienced classical and operational success on the international stage.

Modern Wales has retained the instruments and influence of its traditional musical roots and continues to grow and diversify its musical identity. One of the biggest stars is Tom Jones who seems unstoppable. He appeared in national consciousness with his 1965 single ‘It’s not Unusual’, which has now become his signature song. Since then he has sold more than 100 million records and noble titles in 2006 for his services to the music industry. Nearly 50 years since launching his musical career, he still rocked the stadium and made the adult woman faint. International stars such as Katherine Jenkins and Charlotte Church have made Wales at the forefront of opera and classical music. After falling in popularity, the men’s choir like the award-winning Only Men Allowed is now enjoying the resurrection. Big name bands like Stereophonics, Manic Street Preachers, Catatonia and Super Furry Animals also emerged from Wales. Today in Wales, you can still catch the harp triple melody, listen to the pibgorn pipe, enjoy the Eisteddfod and be enchanted by the chorus singing, enjoying all the traditional music centuries ago. However, with today’s popular bands such as Lostprophets and Funeral for a Friend, Wales has one foot of music planted firmly in the 21st century as well. With a steady passion and spirit, the musical story of Wales History of Welsh music